Three Babyproofing Tips to Maximize Your Child’s Safety

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advice for young parentsToddlers love to explore, and the stairs are the perfect place to practice climbing, making them one of the most common destinations for babies on the go. But they can also be extremely dangerous if toddlers try to climb them on their own, making it essential for parents to buy baby gates. You may also want to invest in finger pinch guards, wall outlet covers, and other protective equipment to keep your baby safe.

While these are all items that you can purchase, you may also be able to make some decor changes and adjustments to your house to enhance your safety mission. This is crucial, as the leading cause of death in children is unintentional injuries.

Here a few pieces of advice for young parents that are childproofing the house.

  • Rounded Tables. You may want to make a few furniture switches in your living room or kitchen in order to maximize your baby’s safety. If you have a square or rectangular coffee table or dinner table, you may want to consider replacing it with a rounded one. This does not mean that you have to ditch your fancy wooden tables, but rather put them away for a couple of years while your child grows. You don’t have to buy expensive tables either, because your toddler will probably scratch it up anyway.
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  • Removing Fancy Artwork. If you value your priceless artwork, vases, and statues, as well as your toddler’s safety, you will want to put your ceramic pieces away as soon as your child becomes mobile. He or she will likely grab at anything in sight, meaning that your wall hangings, and the china sets on display, are in danger of breaking. More importantly, shards and sharp edges from these items can severely injure your child.
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  • Move Bookshelves. You are probably getting used to cleaning up after your roaming child, picking up extra toys, and putting them back in their bins. But leaving books on a bookshelf in your living room could be a terrible idea. One of the best pieces of advice for young parents is to completely remove any non-baby books from the vicinity of their child. Until they hit three years old, most children continue to put things in their mouth, including books. So, you can say goodbye to your favorite novels, and hello to ink in your child’s mouth, and possibly even paper cuts.


With the help of commercial child safety products, this advice for young parents, and a few alterations around your house, you will be providing your child with a secure environment.

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A Babyproofing Checklist for the Dangers You Might Not Have Thought About

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Babyproofing your homeIf you have a toddler, or even a baby who’s not quite yet walking, but has learned to crawl and to pull herself up on furniture and “cruise” around the room, it’s likely that you spend a fair amount of time each day removing items from her reach, her grasp, or even her mouth. Young children are naturally curious, and they test the world around them by touching and tasting everything they can. This means that parents of little explorers need to babyproof their home, Grandma’s house and anyplace else the child might spend time.


Babyproofing your home is about more than just pushing plastic covers over electrical outlets and hiding the sharp knives. It’s an attitude you need to take while approaching each part of the home that your child has access to. Are you ready to make your rooms baby friendly? Here is a convenient babyproofing checklist.


Babyproofing Your Home: The Heavy Things
One of the most terrifying sounds you can hear is the sound of a heavy thud followed by a child screaming or crying. It’s a risk we often have trouble “seeing” because heavy cabinets and items aren’t usually a danger to us. Things you should keep in mind:

  • Over 20,000 people end up in the emergency rooms as a result of unstable furniture. About 300 kids end up dying as a result of being crushed or otherwise injured by a large bookcase or shelving unit.
  • Although most of us identify heavy televisions and similar items as potential hazards, many children have suffocated under something as small as a 30-inch dresser.
  • Make sure any heavy items are not only properly secured, but also pose no risk if parts (like shelves) are pulled on by grabby hands.
  • Very small children should be placed in cribs or playpens during nap time in order to reduce exploration.
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